textiles Posts

Pop Up Shop: Turkish Bazaar

We love Turkey, linens (towels, bedding, and throws), and supporting our neighbors’ small businesses. So when we got the opportunity to help our Turkish neighbors by offering our studio for a weekend pop up shop, we jumped at the chance! Come by Balance Design in Candler Park this Saturday and Sunday to find the perfect beach towel, bedding, or a treasured gift. See you there!

The Colors of Mexico

By: Verena Dalati Salmé

My recent trip to Mexico City was as inspiring as it was relaxing. The locals were friendly, the food was delicious, and the history was rich. Among the art, museums, and regional traditions I experienced, there was one overarching theme I couldn’t ignore: COLOR! From painted buildings to artisan creations, unique color palettes were created by ordinary items in brilliant hues.

Mexico 1

Cayenne | Emerald | Blush

1. Door detail by architect Luis Barragan, Casa de Luis Barragan, photo courtesy of Guy Salmé.
2. “Frida on White Bench” by Nickolas Muray, Fenimore Art Museum.
3. Traditional dress detail, photo courtesy of Guy Salmé.

Mexico 2

Aqua | Terracotta | Yellow

1. Mexican ceramic tile detail, Puebla, Mexico, photo courtesy of Guy Salmé.
2. Amor graffiti, Puebla, Mexico, photo courtesy of Guy Salmé.
3. Acapulco chair, Replica Furniture.

Mexico 3

Bubblegum | Seafoam | Caramel

1. Seafoam door with bubblegum accents, Mexico City, photographer unknown.
2. Brooklyn brownstone, Brooklyn, NY, photo courtesy of Andrew Cammarano.
3. Cacti needles, Luis Barragan building, Mexico City, photographer unknown.

Mexico 4

Royal Blue | Ivory | Oatmeal

1. Standing bear sculpture, painted wood, Oaxaca, Mexico.
2. Talavera tile detail, House of Tiles, Mexico City, photo courtesy of Guy Salmé.
3. Talavera salsa bowl, indeeddecor.com.

Mexico 5

Goldenrod | Chili Red | Pepper Black

1. Traditional Mexican corn on the cob, photographer unknown.
2. “Do Not Throw Trash” Ciudadela Market, Mexico City, photo courtesy of Guy Salmé.
3. Prickly pear chair, designed by Valentina Gonzalez Wohlers, traditional Mexican Otomi fabric.

From market streets to boutique gems, the colors of Mexico are bold, rich, and spicy — how can you not be inspired?