interior design Posts

Color Palette: Summer Rain

By: Danielle Clockel

We’re in the thick of summer showers here in Atlanta. Don’t let it get you down! Check out this soothing color palette inspired by our local weather.

Photo courtesy of How Sweet It Is.

From top to bottom:
Farrow & Ball No. 266 Mizzle
Benjamin Moore 415 Riverdale Green
Sherwin Williams 6709 Gleeful
Sherwin Williams 6434 Spinach White
Farrow & Ball No. 287 Yeabridge Green

Our Neighbors’ Kitchen

By: Elisabeth Paulson

The finished product of this home in the Lake Claire/Candler Park neighborhood of Atlanta was truly a result of contradictions. The galley kitchen was part of the original home, while the vaulted extension housed an overly-engineered laundry room and mud room. We unified this space with cleanly-planed, clear-oil-finished antique lumber beams that look like they were born there.

Photography by Danielle Clockel for Balance Design.

We were lucky enough to work with the couple that calls this place home and get to know them a bit. They love cooking and beer and added their own distinct styles to the home: hers more farmhouse rustic, his more modern. A European drinking sink and fittings, handmade beer tapper, and chef’s kitchen spray faucet were only a handful of requests to make this dream kitchen.

Photography by Danielle Clockel for Balance Design.

Since the narrow space didn’t allow for an island, we incorporated a New York style deli counter instead, opening up the windows to the side yard.

Photography by Danielle Clockel for Balance Design.

The counter was built from a 110-year-old live edge white oak from the Emory University campus and formed the foreground for a truly unique quartzite wrapped bar and lacquered floating wall cabinets.

Photography by Danielle Clockel for Balance Design.

This project was definitely one of our favorites! Not only were the clients creative and possessed an incredible sense of style, but the finished product is something we’re extremely proud of. With those exposed beams, a custom bar, and a deli style counter, what’s not to love?

Wanderlust: San Diego

By: Shelby Adamson Pawlak

My husband and I recently had the chance to jaunt to the west coast, where I was a bridesmaid in a good friend’s wedding in San Diego.

Photo courtesy of San Diego Eater.

Photo courtesy of NBC.

Upon arrival we made our first stop at Liberty Public Market. Old navy barricades were transformed into eateries, bars, and craft vendors. What I loved about the space, besides the food and unique artful gifts, were the farmers market booths on the lawn and the vegetable garden growing out front. Spanish style architecture and bright paint helped us to appreciate not only the food but the detail in the structure as well. We loved it so much we went our first and last day in California.

Photo courtesy of California Beaches.

Photo courtesy of Traveldigg.com.

The next place on our list was Balboa Park. Rich in history, the park is home to multiple museums, performing arts venues, beautifully lush gardens, greenhouses, trails, and of course the San Diego Zoo. San Diego has the perfect climate for vegetation and it’s easy to lose yourself in the vast rose and cactus gardens. Our personal favorite was the greenhouse, which had an abundance of every plant you can think of. We even saw a staghorn fern that was close to 6 feet tall! Spectacular!

Photo courtesy of La Jolla Mom.

Photo courtesy of Hipmunk.

Our last leg of the trip was the wedding in La Jolla. The drive up was incredibly stunning with bright yellow and orange wild flowers climbing their way up the cliffs along the highway. We were lucky to have the venue directly on the beach, and allowed ourselves to get lost staring into the vast turquoise of the ocean and the beautiful topography of southern California. We treated ourselves to a night at La Valencia hotel, a Spanish style establishment built in 1926 that boasts original hand painted murals from the 1940s and is set right on the ocean. We did not want to leave!

We loved our visit to southern California and the only regret we had was not staying longer!

Serene and Strong: Zen Gardens

By: Danielle Clockel

Everyone needs a place they can go to be still and quiet, and unwind from the stress of the day. For some, that place is a comfy chair nestled within a room in the home. For others, it’s a luxurious bath. And still others find their peace in nature. The garden has long been a place to go to reflect and regroup, and none is more up to this task than Japanese zen gardens. (I mean, it’s in the name!)

zen1

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.

While they are called “rock gardens,” don’t think you have to completely forsake your beloved plants. Most zen gardens heavily feature stonework and pebbles, but mossy patches and petite trees are also right at home here.

zen2

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.

Maybe you just don’t have a green thumb. Hey, we’re not judging you. Immerse yourself in the meditative process of raking intricate swirls (symbolizing ripples on water) into the pebble gravel of your rock garden. It may be neutral in color, but this garden has visual interest galore!

Minimalism may be a common theme in these kinds of gardens, but don’t fret, maximalists — you can still go big! Shapely trees, peaceful ponds, meandering bridges, different levels…this garden has it all.

zen3

Photo courtesy of Damien Douxchamps.

You can still feature color even if you’re more into rocks than roses. Different stones have different hues, and arranging them in a geometric patchwork creates a fun, modern look.

Because of Atlanta’s climate, it’s easy for us to get wrapped up in landscapes full of lush greenery and bright flowers. But that’s not the only way to turn your outdoor space into a personal paradise! Just picture yourself in the quiet serenity of these zen gardens, and find your inner peace.

Abstraction and Color: Stonewashed Indigo Linens

By: Danielle Clockel

Abstract expressionism divides people like no other art genre — you either love it or you hate it. I personally love any art that moves me when I see it, and makes an impact on the space it inhabits. Let’s consider Mark Rothko’s color field paintings.

rothko

Mark Rothko “Green on Blue.

A key player in the abstract expressionist movement (right alongside Jackson Pollack), Mark Rothko’s massive canvases of color are meant to be viewed up close and personal. They are so big that they surround you and engulf your peripheral vision, transforming the act of viewing into a complete experience. I can only imagine immersing myself in the cool blue and distressed texture of “Green on Blue” here.

rothkobedding

Photo courtesy of House of Baltic Linen.

The beauty of abstraction is that it’s up to the viewer to decide what they see. For me, Rothko’s painting evokes soft, stonewashed linen bedding. The deep indigo hues intermeshed with worn-yet-bright whites make me want to float off into a cool, calming dreamland.