Color Obsession Posts

Color Palette: Helen Frankenthaler

By: Danielle Clockel

A female pioneer of the somewhat male-dominated abstract expressionist movement of the ’50s and ’60s, Helen Frankenthaler’s color field paintings often look like fluid watercolors. In actuality, they are oil or acrylic paint diluted with turpentine. This “soak stain” technique creates ethereal yet saturated compositions that are still modern, soft, and bold all at once.

Photo courtesy of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Top to bottom:
1. Sherwin Williams Country Squire SW6475
2. Farrow & Ball Nancy’s Blushes No. 278
3. Sherwin Williams Halcyon Green SW6213
4. Farrow & Ball Cook’s Blue No. 237
5. Benjamin Moore Peony 2079-30

Color Palette: Edward Hopper

By: Danielle Clockel

“Nighthawks” by Edward Hopper is one of the most recognizable American paintings, arguably due to its strong color blocking and mysterious subjects (the people inside the restaurant). We love Hopper’s focus on architecture and interior details, such as the jade green tile snaking around the curve of the window. The color palette is at once earthy and industrial, subdued in hue yet bold in intensity.

From left to right:
Benjamin Moore Waller Green CW-510
Farrow & Ball Calke Green No. 34
Sherwin Williams Fired Brick SW 6335
Benjamin Moore Lemon Twist 394
Sherwin Williams Dark Night SW 6237
Benjamin Moore Autumn Orange 2156-10

5 Uncommon and Unexpected Color Pairings

By: The Balance Design Team

Feeling uninspired by the color schemes you’ve seen over and over again? Us too. We stepped out of our comfort zones to create bold, fresh color palettes that challenged us and even changed our minds about a few hot-button colors.

Blush & Persimmon

If you think pink and orange is a juvenile combination, think again! Combining similar hues of blush and persimmon evokes feelings of old world spices and soft floral dyes, with the muted blush acting almost as a neutral. This palette feels like a soft yet energetic beginning of a new day.

Green & Black

We love the combination of deep green and black — it’s modern and current, yet grounded. Picture a gleaming grand piano with an emerald green bench. Choose a slick lacquer black to really set this pairing up for success!

Ochre & Plum

Deep purples and golden yellows create a luxurious but playful color palette, and the contrast of light and dark keeps this pairing rich, but not heavy. Utilize velvets and leathers for an ultra sumptuous experience.

Neon Yellow & Slate Blue

We know neon isn’t for everyone, and in fact there are some strong feelings about it amongst our team! But paired with a grounding, chalky navy blue, it gives the right amount of POP to an otherwise standard neutral. By embracing a difficult color, a beautiful palette was brought to our attention — and honestly, we quite like it!

Sea Green & Coral

This is the more saturated, modern version of the aqua and peach of the 80’s. When paired together with a warmer neutral, like a bronze or caramel, a once dated color scheme is revitalized. Plus, balancing brighter colors with neutral metals and textures is a great way to create harmony.

When you’re feeling burned out or uninspired by your “usuals” and “go-to’s,” try taking a second look at something you thought you didn’t like. Challenge yourself to look at it from a different point of view or in a different context — you might find a new favorite!

Color Palette: Frida Kahlo

By: Danielle Clockel

Frida Kahlo’s art is instantly recognizable through her powerful portraits and earthy-yet-vibrant color palettes. Symbolically, her work is rich with women’s empowerment, rebellion against societal norms, and heartfelt self expression. How can we not be inspired?

Top to bottom:
Benjamin Moore Vintage Charm 1455
Farrow & Ball Sudbury Yellow No. 51
Benjamin Moore Seaweed 2035-10
Sherwin Williams Jasper 6216
Sherwin Williams Jalapeno 6629

Back to Black: 5 Shades We Love

By: Danielle Clockel

When you think of neutrals, do you only think of greys, whites, and tans? Let’s change that! Moving to the darker end of the spectrum, there’s a plethora of charcoals, off-blacks, and deep tones that are incredibly versatile no matter your style.

Sherwin Williams’ Witching Hour

Photo courtesy of One Kings Lane.

Cooler than the other side of the pillow! This deep dark hue looks ultra sharp against crisp white trim on interior walls. If the thought of painting your home black makes you nervous, this is more of a jeweled blue — fancy!

Farrow & Ball’s Studio Green

Photo courtesy of Chalkboard Living.

By now you know we love this neutral; it changes color throughout the day as light hits it and is a great way to neutralize green and evoke a classic look. Great paint option for built-ins, cabinets, libraries, or a dramatic dining room.

Benjamin Moore’s Mopboard

Photo courtesy of The Kitchn.

A true black that looks velvety and soft, not stark and scary. Live your Victorian gothic dream with this brooding-yet-comfortable black.

Farrow & Ball’s Mahogany

Photo courtesy of Farrow & Ball.

As the name implies, this is a black so warm it almost goes brown. Perfect as a grounding contrast with golden yellows, soft taupes, and even wispy blushes.

Farrow & Ball’s Paean Black

Photo courtesy of Farrow & Ball.

A passionate purple-black. It’s deep, romantic, and inviting in an unexpected, non-Valentine’s Day way. Ooh la la!

October is a unique month that automatically shifts us into a darker, more dramatic aesthetic. Maybe it’s Halloween’s approach. Maybe it’s the anticipation of shorter days and colder temperatures. Whatever the reason, we embrace it!