Artist in Residence Posts

Artist in Residence: Christina Wedge

By: Danielle Clockel

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Thursday night is our open house and our featured artist, Christina Wedge, will be in attendance as we reveal her latest work. We can’t wait for you to see it all in person, but as a little teaser we sat down with Christina and talked to her about this incredible series.

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

1. What type of subject do you most enjoy shooting?   

Interior photography has always been a passion for me. The act of creating images, framing them, and telling a story. The process itself provides the essential inspiration in what I do. My personal work includes a lot of landscape shooting. I am obsessed with getting lost in areas without a GPS, discovering new cities and countries, and just enjoying the moment.

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

2. What inspired your trip to Iceland and Greenland?

Growing up in Europe, I have always had a bad case of the Iceland bug and desperately wanted to visit this small island in the north Atlantic. I am fascinated by the volcanoes, the wild horses, and the hot springs in the middle of ice and snow. I have always loved the Scandinavian design style which is defined by clean lines, simplicity, minimalism, and functionality. I also wanted to see the culture and extreme environment of Greenland and was so excited when I had the opportunity to tag along with designer and producer Brian Patrick Flynn.

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

3. As far as the natural landscape/ environment, what was your favorite aspect of the trip and why?

Truly memorable to me was hiking in the endless lava fields in Iceland. Experiencing the different colors and shapes of lava, some of which were heavily covered with vivid green moss. Getting lost and ending up in fishing villages where I stayed in hostels (and had probably the best breakfast in my life). Seeing the floating ice pieces on Glacier Lagoon being washed up on the black sand beaches. And of course the Northern lights. They were spectacular and I wished I would have seen more of them.

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

4. Did anything surprise you about either country?

I could not get over the sheep head dish in Iceland! It is a traditional dish consisting of a sheep’s head cut in half on your plate served with vegetables. After taking so many pictures of the sheep on my trip, I just could not believe people were eating them. In Greenland the buildings emphasize functionality over form. Greenlandic homes are typically constructed of stone, sod, or wood, and many Inuit live in single-story, prefabricated wooden houses. Most are heated with oil-burning stoves. These colorful houses make picture perfect opportunities, but I learned from the tour guide that the colors were actually practical and indicated the purpose of each building: commercial houses are red, hospitals are yellow, police stations are black, and fish factories are blue. I am already thinking about going back there and staying there a little longer…in the summer!

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

  

5. What was the biggest challenge you faced on your trip?

I learned not to underestimate the Icelandic weather. It is highly volatile, no matter where you are. If you see a gas station, stop and fill up because you don’t know where you’ll find the next one.

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

6. If you could bring back one piece of Iceland/Greenland, what would it be?

The little husky puppy that followed me around Greenland, and the most amazing silica face mask found at the bottom of the Blue Lagoon.

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Photography by Christina Wedge.

7. What other places are on your bucket list to photograph?

I am traveling to Tuscany Italy this June to teach a workshop and after that I will fly to Norway. The other places on my list: Australia, Israel, Patagonia, Tokyo, and the Faroe Islands.

Pop Art Perfection: The Wrongwoods Console

By: Danielle Clockel

Does art imitate life, or does life imitate art? That is the question. As designers, we think the latter is more fun. For example:

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Roy Lichtenstein, a hugely influential artist in the 1960’s pop art movement, was heavily inspired by commercial advertising and comic book graphics. His style is instantly recognizable by his use of bold, thick lines and bright color.

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First of all, how incredible is this faux bois Wrongwoods console? Designed by Richard Woods and Sebastian Wrong (hence the name), the graphic nature of the finish, eye-catching colors, and mid century modern shape harkens to pop art like Lichtenstein’s. It’s like one of his paintings came to life!

Incorporating art into your home is something we hold in very high regard and try to implement in all of our projects. This piece takes that concept to a whole new level, and we love it!

Happy Thanksgiving From Balance Design!

By: Stephanie Andrews

Photo courtesy of Jason Peterson.

Photo courtesy of Jason Peterson.

After an emotional election leading into the holiday season, I feel encouraged to reach out to our readers, clients, family, and friends for Thanksgiving. I feel very connected to this holiday because of my role as an interior designer, creating homes that are warm, inviting, and full of life. I encourage everyone to take some time away from the hustle of 2016 news, politics, business, and uncertainty to truly breathe and enjoy the traditions of this holiday.

This black and white photograph by Jason Peterson celebrates just that. His Instagram is filled with images that are both powerful and soothing. He portrays hope in a time of uncertainty. Looking at this image, we can remember our roots, our heritage, the meaning of Thanksgiving, and our responsibilities as citizens of our beautiful country.

Artist in Residence: Rusty Walton

By: Stephanie Andrews

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A few times a year at our studio we feature a local, emerging artist that we believe will resonate with our core belief in living an authentic life. We could not be more excited to introduce you to our newest artist that we are featuring in November: Rusty Walton. I have known Rusty personally for about five years and we have become close friends. His background is inspiring: he has lived all over the globe and worked with some of the world’s best known interior designers during his time in New York. He has a zen like quality when working, staying calm and open minded to sudden challenges that are presented to him. I asked him a few questions about his art as well as his design philosophy.

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1. How would you describe your art?

“I am consistently searching for a medium that communicates simplicity. Much of my mixed media is minimalist, however I try to draw the viewer closer and evoke emotion. My goal is make an idea real, thereby experiencing the process for myself and creating an experience for the viewer.”

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2. What about your photography?

“I am all about expressing intimacy in my photography, even if it’s slightly uncomfortable. I seek to expose rather than to mystify. True intimacy is born of exposure.” 

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3. Why did you want to add furniture design to your repertoire?

“It wasn’t a conscious decision, just an organic evolution. I originally started making furniture for myself years ago because I was too poor to buy any, I didn’t like much of what I saw, and I could get something far more interesting if I built it myself. I quickly realized that there were so many possibilities that we never see. Exploring that is fun and fascinating. When I was doing interior design in New York I would design almost all of the furniture for my clients. Everything they had by the end of the job was uniquely theirs.”

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4. What would you describe as a dream project?

“A dream project would be to go to a place where the local architecture has been lost and replaced with some foreign concept of normal, and help revive that style in a way that would work today. We all seem to get locked into ideas of what is “normal” and so often that idea doesn’t work and disempowers people. A place’s culture, climate, materials, values, spirituality, etc. can all be assembled to create perfect dwellings if we allow them freedom to do so. That’s an endeavor I could really sink my teeth into.”

Join us at our open house November 17 to see Rusty’s incredible work in person. We’ll see you there!

Our Favorite Spaces: Shelby’s Daring Dining Room

By: Shelby Adamson

I live in a 1968 ranch home and have changed my dining room a few times. I started with a white table, navy chairs, stenciled wall, and capiz chandelier (a la beachy shabby chic) but I really wanted to embrace the era of my home and give it some high contrast pop. Inspired by Jonathan Adler’s colorful, happy spaces, I have come to treat my house less like a model home, and more like an authentic space that makes myself and my husband happy.

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Because my dining room acts as a passage to the patio, I needed a round table that allowed movement. With most of the room being neutrals I wanted a pop, and being obsessed with deep pinks and fuchsias led me to Benjamin Moore’s Gypsy Pink. The large mirror on the wall reflects the window and brings in more light. I chose Benjamin Moore’s Van Deusen Blue for the wall—a chalky navy that doesn’t absorb too much light. Mimicking the look of large molding with white paint, I painted the top and bottom of the wall. 

I’m a big fan of midcentury wishbone chairs, and these were a DIY project I’m pretty proud of. The seats were awful, so I dyed some white cotton to look like Shibori and recovered them. The finishing touch? A sputnik inspired light that really brings a fun modern flair to the room.  

Overall I am thrilled with the space and how it feels finished. As a designer, it can be a real challenge to complete your own home!