elements Posts

Elements of a Photoshoot

By: Shelby Adamson

Many of us find ourselves opening up a magazine to peruse the beautiful photos and think, “why doesn’t my home look like this?” Well, coming from a team of designers that do this on a daily basis, there is a lot of work that goes into these productions to get the perfect shot!

When scheduling a photoshoot, there are a few key aspects to consider. First is the time of day. The ideal time to photograph is when the sun is overhead, allowing for good lighting and avoiding harsh sun rays that tend to hit in the later afternoon.

Courtesy of Tracy Cox for Balance Design.

Then we scout the room — take a few test shots to review later and determine what needs to be added and removed from the space. (We typically pull out anything that feels too large or doesn’t compliment or enhance the space). Sometimes a beloved piece of furniture is incredibly comfortable, but appears too visually bulky through the lens of the camera. Finally, a color scheme is determined with pillows, accessories, textural pieces, and most importantly plants! Flowers and foliage are a designer’s best friend, whether we’re going for leafy, tall, full, soft, or angular — the greenery really amps up the attitude of the room.

Courtesy of Danielle Clockel for Balance Design.

On the day of the photo shoot, the initial shot is reviewed on a computer screen to see how different factors affect the image: shallow vs deep depth of field, varying levels of lighting, vertical vs horizontal orientation, etc. The hardest part of this process is removing yourself from the physical environment and focusing solely on the image onscreen to determine what visually works, what does not, and what needs to be rearranged. Many pieces that appear “perfect” in a photograph have actually been maneuvered into strange positions to have the correct proportions (thanks, lens distortion!). Multiple shots are taken in various angles and orientations, as well as full room and vignettes to spotlight the designer’s favorite details.

Courtesy of Christina Wedge for Balance Design.

After the photoshoot is over, the photographer processes the many (many) files and layers multiple photos of the same room to optimize exposures, which ensures that certain areas are highlighted, others are complimented, and the rest fall away. Once the editing process is complete, the designer and photographer review the finished photos to determine any additional tweaks and edits.

Courtesy of Christina Wedge for Balance Design.

Finally, favorite shots are chosen and the final product is a beautiful, layered, and labor intensive work of love!

 

It’s Element-ary! How to Incorporate The Four Elements in Your Home.

By: Danielle Clockel

The four elements of earth, fire, air, and water were used by the ancient Greeks as a way to simplify life’s complexities. Nowadays, we often refer to them in terms of our personalities. For example, maybe you identify with the free-spirited nature of the wind, or are passionate and fierce like fire. Whichever one speaks to you, here are some ways to really get in your element at home.

Earth.

Photo courtesy of Femina.

Filling your home with plants is the best way to immerse yourself in earthy goodness. But what if you don’t have a green thumb? We love pressed plant art as a way for everyone to celebrate their earth element roots in a clean, modern way.

Fire.

Photo courtesy of Frerik Hylten-Cavallius.

There’s something so comfortingly primal about fire. Grand fireplaces and outdoor fire pits are amazing to gather around, but not everyone has the space for them. That’s not an issue for petite ethanol-burning stoves. These little guys are perfect for feisty spirits in any size abode, especially since they don’t produce smoke.

Air.

Photo courtesy of Studio KO.

This is an easy one: just open up! Open any doors and windows you can and get some air flowing through your home. That feel of a gentle, calm breeze — what can be better? How about standing amongst flowing sheer window panels like some sort of goddess? Yes, that.

Water.

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.

Ceiling mounted rainwater shower heads. Floor inset soaking tubs. These are amazing ways to turn your morning (or evening) shower into a luxurious submersion, but what else? Match your floor and walls in a cool blue handmade tile to channel the experience of swimming through a beautiful lagoon every time you bathe.

Natural elements in the home, regardless of which specific one they reflect, make a space feel grounded, intentional, and authentic. And of course you can mix several elements in one room — whatever speaks to you!