painting Posts

Art Crush: Crysta Luke’s Abstract Paintings

By: Danielle Clockel

Crysta Luke, one of the featured artists we’re unveiling at our open house this Thursday, is an incredibly talented abstract painter right here in Atlanta.

She says of her work, “I say with paint what I cannot with words.” With materials ranging from paints and drawing materials to metal leaf, her energetic marks and tactile texture invite you to come closer and closer to examine the most minute details.

Far from limiting herself to only large paintings, Crysta creates petite, intricate, small scale paintings on wood as well.

Come by the Balance Design studio this Thursday (or any time Monday through Friday!) to see our full selection of Crysta’s art, our spring/summer custom pieces, and photography by our other featured artist, Emily Grant.

Spring Collection 2018: Bright and Bold!

By: The Balance Design Team

Join us as we unveil our new featured artists Crysta Luke and Emily Grant, and introduce our spring/summer collection.

We are thrilled to show the dynamic abstract art of Crysta Luke, some oversized and some petite — all fabulous!


We are also excited to introduce newcomer Emily Grant, showcasing her luscious and moody still life photography.


Join us Thursday May 24, 7-9pm for Latin inspired cocktails and tapas! See you there!

The Expressive Line: Moroccan Rug

By: Danielle Clockel

Renowned American abstract artist Cy Twombly described his work as “childlike, but not childish.” This assertion referred largely to the freeform, organic lines in his paintings, but we also like this as a mantra for personal style.

Photo courtesy of Eye Likey.

Far from having a negative connotation, the word “childlike” evokes a sense of wonder, free spiritedness, and glee. And who doesn’t want a little bit of that in their home? We see these attributes (both conceptually and graphically) in Moroccan rugs like this one.

Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Collection.

A rejection of perfection, this rug (and ones like it) embraces playfulness in design while still showing a mastery of craft. Moroccan rugs are a classic design staple, and it’s not hard to see why! Such a rug elevates any space while remaining fun and fresh.

Transitions with Color and Subtle Connectivity

By: Loren H. Pratt

Photo courtesy of Hygge & West.

 

Recently the talented team at Balance Design helped me select and install this Hygge & West wallpaper in the top stair landing of my home. The inky blue color and quirky copper design reflects the mood of my home: cheerful and playful, yet sophisticated and relaxed. It invigorates the landing by adding movement, and the metallic details reflect light, making the area seem larger. This wallpaper inspired me to make the most of my transitional spaces.

In the past, I viewed these spaces (front entryway, hallway, and staircase) as simply a means to an end — get me to the next real space. However, they don’t have to simply be placeholders for connecting the main living areas; they can communicate something about you and reinforce the mood of your home as well.

Color

Color is an easy way to create mood and connect spaces. Blue is the primary color unifying the rooms in my open-concept home.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

Various shades of blue help the oversize photograph flow into the almost indigo color of the upstairs wallpaper. I love how the copper frame of the Brittany Kidd photograph (another Balance Design purchase!) complements—both in movement and color—the model’s hair color in the image and the underwater sea creatures in the landing wallpaper. Color unifies all of these spaces and helps you move naturally from one to the next.

Subtle Connectivity

I love a subtle theme. We’re not talking about your grandparents’ “Santa Fe room.” (I hope I’m not the only one with grandparents who had a Western themed room.) One or more subtle themes can tie multiple areas together. An implicit theme of water flows (couldn’t help myself) through the transition spaces in my home.

An abstract painting in the downstairs hallway was created at the beach, where the artist, Candace Greer, incorporated sand into the paint. The different blue shades symbolize the ocean and sky, and the hallway rug below the painting is reminiscent of coral. In the racy laundromat scene, the circular washing machines remind me of submarine windows.

Painting by Candace Greer.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

As I mentioned, the wallpaper contains whimsical underwater creatures perfectly in keeping with the water theme.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

Perhaps few will notice the subtle connections between these transitional spaces, but they really bring a sense of passage and evolution to otherwise mundane areas in our home. Take a second look at your “in between” spaces. Let them connect to each other and communicate something interesting.

Loren Pratt is a lawyer and legal writing professor who loves interior design. Her legal writing background influences her affinity for juxtaposing order and symmetry with personality and flair in decorating. Loren loves working with the Balance Design team when she’s stumped with a design challenge or when she needs a second opinion. Follow Loren to see what inspires her as she decorates her new Atlanta home. 

Abstraction and Color: Stonewashed Indigo Linens

By: Danielle Clockel

Abstract expressionism divides people like no other art genre — you either love it or you hate it. I personally love any art that moves me when I see it, and makes an impact on the space it inhabits. Let’s consider Mark Rothko’s color field paintings.

rothko

Mark Rothko “Green on Blue.

A key player in the abstract expressionist movement (right alongside Jackson Pollack), Mark Rothko’s massive canvases of color are meant to be viewed up close and personal. They are so big that they surround you and engulf your peripheral vision, transforming the act of viewing into a complete experience. I can only imagine immersing myself in the cool blue and distressed texture of “Green on Blue” here.

rothkobedding

Photo courtesy of House of Baltic Linen.

The beauty of abstraction is that it’s up to the viewer to decide what they see. For me, Rothko’s painting evokes soft, stonewashed linen bedding. The deep indigo hues intermeshed with worn-yet-bright whites make me want to float off into a cool, calming dreamland.