painting Posts

The Expressive Line: Moroccan Rug

By: Danielle Clockel

Renowned American abstract artist Cy Twombly described his work as “childlike, but not childish.” This assertion referred largely to the freeform, organic lines in his paintings, but we also like this as a mantra for personal style.

Photo courtesy of Eye Likey.

Far from having a negative connotation, the word “childlike” evokes a sense of wonder, free spiritedness, and glee. And who doesn’t want a little bit of that in their home? We see these attributes (both conceptually and graphically) in Moroccan rugs like this one.

Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Collection.

A rejection of perfection, this rug (and ones like it) embraces playfulness in design while still showing a mastery of craft. Moroccan rugs are a classic design staple, and it’s not hard to see why! Such a rug elevates any space while remaining fun and fresh.

Transitions with Color and Subtle Connectivity

By: Loren H. Pratt

Photo courtesy of Hygge & West.

 

Recently the talented team at Balance Design helped me select and install this Hygge & West wallpaper in the top stair landing of my home. The inky blue color and quirky copper design reflects the mood of my home: cheerful and playful, yet sophisticated and relaxed. It invigorates the landing by adding movement, and the metallic details reflect light, making the area seem larger. This wallpaper inspired me to make the most of my transitional spaces.

In the past, I viewed these spaces (front entryway, hallway, and staircase) as simply a means to an end — get me to the next real space. However, they don’t have to simply be placeholders for connecting the main living areas; they can communicate something about you and reinforce the mood of your home as well.

Color

Color is an easy way to create mood and connect spaces. Blue is the primary color unifying the rooms in my open-concept home.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

Various shades of blue help the oversize photograph flow into the almost indigo color of the upstairs wallpaper. I love how the copper frame of the Brittany Kidd photograph (another Balance Design purchase!) complements—both in movement and color—the model’s hair color in the image and the underwater sea creatures in the landing wallpaper. Color unifies all of these spaces and helps you move naturally from one to the next.

Subtle Connectivity

I love a subtle theme. We’re not talking about your grandparents’ “Santa Fe room.” (I hope I’m not the only one with grandparents who had a Western themed room.) One or more subtle themes can tie multiple areas together. An implicit theme of water flows (couldn’t help myself) through the transition spaces in my home.

An abstract painting in the downstairs hallway was created at the beach, where the artist, Candace Greer, incorporated sand into the paint. The different blue shades symbolize the ocean and sky, and the hallway rug below the painting is reminiscent of coral. In the racy laundromat scene, the circular washing machines remind me of submarine windows.

Painting by Candace Greer.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

As I mentioned, the wallpaper contains whimsical underwater creatures perfectly in keeping with the water theme.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

Perhaps few will notice the subtle connections between these transitional spaces, but they really bring a sense of passage and evolution to otherwise mundane areas in our home. Take a second look at your “in between” spaces. Let them connect to each other and communicate something interesting.

Loren Pratt is a lawyer and legal writing professor who loves interior design. Her legal writing background influences her affinity for juxtaposing order and symmetry with personality and flair in decorating. Loren loves working with the Balance Design team when she’s stumped with a design challenge or when she needs a second opinion. Follow Loren to see what inspires her as she decorates her new Atlanta home. 

Abstraction and Color: Stonewashed Indigo Linens

By: Danielle Clockel

Abstract expressionism divides people like no other art genre — you either love it or you hate it. I personally love any art that moves me when I see it, and makes an impact on the space it inhabits. Let’s consider Mark Rothko’s color field paintings.

rothko

Mark Rothko “Green on Blue.

A key player in the abstract expressionist movement (right alongside Jackson Pollack), Mark Rothko’s massive canvases of color are meant to be viewed up close and personal. They are so big that they surround you and engulf your peripheral vision, transforming the act of viewing into a complete experience. I can only imagine immersing myself in the cool blue and distressed texture of “Green on Blue” here.

rothkobedding

Photo courtesy of House of Baltic Linen.

The beauty of abstraction is that it’s up to the viewer to decide what they see. For me, Rothko’s painting evokes soft, stonewashed linen bedding. The deep indigo hues intermeshed with worn-yet-bright whites make me want to float off into a cool, calming dreamland.

Pop Art Perfection: The Wrongwoods Console

By: Danielle Clockel

Does art imitate life, or does life imitate art? That is the question. As designers, we think the latter is more fun. For example:

Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, a hugely influential artist in the 1960’s pop art movement, was heavily inspired by commercial advertising and comic book graphics. His style is instantly recognizable by his use of bold, thick lines and bright color.

wrongwoods

First of all, how incredible is this faux bois Wrongwoods console? Designed by Richard Woods and Sebastian Wrong (hence the name), the graphic nature of the finish, eye-catching colors, and mid century modern shape harkens to pop art like Lichtenstein’s. It’s like one of his paintings came to life!

Incorporating art into your home is something we hold in very high regard and try to implement in all of our projects. This piece takes that concept to a whole new level, and we love it!

Artist in Residence: Rusty Walton

By: Stephanie Andrews

rustywaltonheadshotbw

A few times a year at our studio we feature a local, emerging artist that we believe will resonate with our core belief in living an authentic life. We could not be more excited to introduce you to our newest artist that we are featuring in November: Rusty Walton. I have known Rusty personally for about five years and we have become close friends. His background is inspiring: he has lived all over the globe and worked with some of the world’s best known interior designers during his time in New York. He has a zen like quality when working, staying calm and open minded to sudden challenges that are presented to him. I asked him a few questions about his art as well as his design philosophy.

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1. How would you describe your art?

“I am consistently searching for a medium that communicates simplicity. Much of my mixed media is minimalist, however I try to draw the viewer closer and evoke emotion. My goal is make an idea real, thereby experiencing the process for myself and creating an experience for the viewer.”

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2. What about your photography?

“I am all about expressing intimacy in my photography, even if it’s slightly uncomfortable. I seek to expose rather than to mystify. True intimacy is born of exposure.” 

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3. Why did you want to add furniture design to your repertoire?

“It wasn’t a conscious decision, just an organic evolution. I originally started making furniture for myself years ago because I was too poor to buy any, I didn’t like much of what I saw, and I could get something far more interesting if I built it myself. I quickly realized that there were so many possibilities that we never see. Exploring that is fun and fascinating. When I was doing interior design in New York I would design almost all of the furniture for my clients. Everything they had by the end of the job was uniquely theirs.”

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4. What would you describe as a dream project?

“A dream project would be to go to a place where the local architecture has been lost and replaced with some foreign concept of normal, and help revive that style in a way that would work today. We all seem to get locked into ideas of what is “normal” and so often that idea doesn’t work and disempowers people. A place’s culture, climate, materials, values, spirituality, etc. can all be assembled to create perfect dwellings if we allow them freedom to do so. That’s an endeavor I could really sink my teeth into.”

Join us at our open house November 17 to see Rusty’s incredible work in person. We’ll see you there!