Danielle Clockel Posts

Color Palette: Summer Rain

By: Danielle Clockel

We’re in the thick of summer showers here in Atlanta. Don’t let it get you down! Check out this soothing color palette inspired by our local weather.

Photo courtesy of How Sweet It Is.

From top to bottom:
Farrow & Ball No. 266 Mizzle
Benjamin Moore 415 Riverdale Green
Sherwin Williams 6709 Gleeful
Sherwin Williams 6434 Spinach White
Farrow & Ball No. 287 Yeabridge Green

Transitions with Color and Subtle Connectivity

By: Loren H. Pratt

Photo courtesy of Hygge & West.

 

Recently the talented team at Balance Design helped me select and install this Hygge & West wallpaper in the top stair landing of my home. The inky blue color and quirky copper design reflects the mood of my home: cheerful and playful, yet sophisticated and relaxed. It invigorates the landing by adding movement, and the metallic details reflect light, making the area seem larger. This wallpaper inspired me to make the most of my transitional spaces.

In the past, I viewed these spaces (front entryway, hallway, and staircase) as simply a means to an end — get me to the next real space. However, they don’t have to simply be placeholders for connecting the main living areas; they can communicate something about you and reinforce the mood of your home as well.

Color

Color is an easy way to create mood and connect spaces. Blue is the primary color unifying the rooms in my open-concept home.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

Various shades of blue help the oversize photograph flow into the almost indigo color of the upstairs wallpaper. I love how the copper frame of the Brittany Kidd photograph (another Balance Design purchase!) complements—both in movement and color—the model’s hair color in the image and the underwater sea creatures in the landing wallpaper. Color unifies all of these spaces and helps you move naturally from one to the next.

Subtle Connectivity

I love a subtle theme. We’re not talking about your grandparents’ “Santa Fe room.” (I hope I’m not the only one with grandparents who had a Western themed room.) One or more subtle themes can tie multiple areas together. An implicit theme of water flows (couldn’t help myself) through the transition spaces in my home.

An abstract painting in the downstairs hallway was created at the beach, where the artist, Candace Greer, incorporated sand into the paint. The different blue shades symbolize the ocean and sky, and the hallway rug below the painting is reminiscent of coral. In the racy laundromat scene, the circular washing machines remind me of submarine windows.

Painting by Candace Greer.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

As I mentioned, the wallpaper contains whimsical underwater creatures perfectly in keeping with the water theme.

Photo courtesy of Loren H. Pratt.

Perhaps few will notice the subtle connections between these transitional spaces, but they really bring a sense of passage and evolution to otherwise mundane areas in our home. Take a second look at your “in between” spaces. Let them connect to each other and communicate something interesting.

Loren Pratt is a lawyer and legal writing professor who loves interior design. Her legal writing background influences her affinity for juxtaposing order and symmetry with personality and flair in decorating. Loren loves working with the Balance Design team when she’s stumped with a design challenge or when she needs a second opinion. Follow Loren to see what inspires her as she decorates her new Atlanta home. 

Top Five Pairings: Graham & Brown Wallpaper

By: The Balance Design Team

We’re constantly inspired by fresh and innovative wall treatments — wallpaper, murals, grasscloth, you name it! Each of us scoured Graham & Brown, one of our favorite wallpaper vendors, and chose something that sparked our imagination. Here’s what we like:

Stephanie’s picks

I imagine this Color My Heart wall mural and settee in a mudroom of a young family as a place to put on their shoes and drop their bags. There could also be a big basket for shoes and another for balls, gloves, and frisbees — perfectly placed for outdoor fun!

Elisabeth’s picks

Surround yourself with this super-hip palm wallpaper and escape into that summer reading list you’ve been neglecting. Perfect for a bright sunroom, this graphic botanical print pairs perfectly with this bamboo pendant designed by Edward Linacre. Made without glues or adhesives, this honeycomb-inspired light keeps your air quality as pure as the tropics.

Shelby’s picks

I love the idea of a young independent woman getting her first apartment in the city in a turn of the century building. She has great taste and can rock out her bachelorette pad in a feminine and impactful way. This fabulous gold polka dot wallpaper would be on the ceiling, with her walls in a white chalky paint. Under this amazing wallpaper is her coral tufted settee that she will lounge on, read, or make power deals while sipping her La Croix.

Danielle’s picks

Can I call this look “gruesome glam?” This black and charcoal skull print wallpaper is what my spooky little dreams are made of. But don’t get me wrong, I like a little elegance too! This gilded floor mirror is over-the-top in its style and size, perfect for making sure you’re dressed to kill.

Melody’s picks

The bold print of the World Heritage wallpaper gets me mentally prepared to delve into new lands while sitting in a relaxing hanging chair with an endless supply of books. It’s the perfect escape on a rainy day.

Deirdre’s picks

The Optimum White and Duck Egg wallpaper reminds me of the bold, sensual, and intriguing flowers of Georgia O’Keeffe. Paired with the antique brass of the Bryant Sconce, this is a match made in heaven.

Serene and Strong: Zen Gardens

By: Danielle Clockel

Everyone needs a place they can go to be still and quiet, and unwind from the stress of the day. For some, that place is a comfy chair nestled within a room in the home. For others, it’s a luxurious bath. And still others find their peace in nature. The garden has long been a place to go to reflect and regroup, and none is more up to this task than Japanese zen gardens. (I mean, it’s in the name!)

zen1

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.

While they are called “rock gardens,” don’t think you have to completely forsake your beloved plants. Most zen gardens heavily feature stonework and pebbles, but mossy patches and petite trees are also right at home here.

zen2

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.

Maybe you just don’t have a green thumb. Hey, we’re not judging you. Immerse yourself in the meditative process of raking intricate swirls (symbolizing ripples on water) into the pebble gravel of your rock garden. It may be neutral in color, but this garden has visual interest galore!

Minimalism may be a common theme in these kinds of gardens, but don’t fret, maximalists — you can still go big! Shapely trees, peaceful ponds, meandering bridges, different levels…this garden has it all.

zen3

Photo courtesy of Damien Douxchamps.

You can still feature color even if you’re more into rocks than roses. Different stones have different hues, and arranging them in a geometric patchwork creates a fun, modern look.

Because of Atlanta’s climate, it’s easy for us to get wrapped up in landscapes full of lush greenery and bright flowers. But that’s not the only way to turn your outdoor space into a personal paradise! Just picture yourself in the quiet serenity of these zen gardens, and find your inner peace.

Abstraction and Color: Stonewashed Indigo Linens

By: Danielle Clockel

Abstract expressionism divides people like no other art genre — you either love it or you hate it. I personally love any art that moves me when I see it, and makes an impact on the space it inhabits. Let’s consider Mark Rothko’s color field paintings.

rothko

Mark Rothko “Green on Blue.

A key player in the abstract expressionist movement (right alongside Jackson Pollack), Mark Rothko’s massive canvases of color are meant to be viewed up close and personal. They are so big that they surround you and engulf your peripheral vision, transforming the act of viewing into a complete experience. I can only imagine immersing myself in the cool blue and distressed texture of “Green on Blue” here.

rothkobedding

Photo courtesy of House of Baltic Linen.

The beauty of abstraction is that it’s up to the viewer to decide what they see. For me, Rothko’s painting evokes soft, stonewashed linen bedding. The deep indigo hues intermeshed with worn-yet-bright whites make me want to float off into a cool, calming dreamland.